A Magazine for the George Mason University Community

Archive for September, 2021

10 Digital Innovations You Need to Know About

by Colleen Kearney Rich on September 10th, 2021

Researchers in Mason’s Institute for Digital InnovAtion (IDIA) are doing cutting-edge work to shape the future of our society.

Continue Reading 10 Digital Innovations You Need to Know About


Negotiating with the Taliban

by Mariam Aburdeineh, BA ’13 on September 10th, 2021

Khalid Noor, BA Conflict Analysis and Resolution ’19, is the youngest member of an Afghan negotiating team seeking peace with the Taliban.

Continue Reading Negotiating with the Taliban


Turning an Injury into an Opportunity

by Damian Cristodero on September 7th, 2021

Michael Murphy, MA History ’12, a paraplegic athlete and speaker, has turned his life-changing accident into an inspirational message of positivity and hope, which he details in a new book.

Continue Reading Turning an Injury into an Opportunity


New Research Coming out of Its Shell

by Mariam Aburdeineh, BA ’13 on September 7th, 2021

For decades, research on wood turtles—a threatened reptile species native to North America—has focused on trying to better understand and protect their populations. But there’s one area of wood turtle research that’s been lacking. In spring, a team from George Mason University, the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI), and the Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation (SMSC) headed to the streams to fix that.

Continue Reading New Research Coming out of Its Shell


All Rise

by Mason Spirit contributor on September 3rd, 2021

Melissa Long, JD ’95, became the first Black justice on the Rhode Island Supreme Court earlier this year. Her historic appointment was another moment in her family’s legacy of breaking barriers.

Continue Reading All Rise


A Public Policy Failure

by Buzz McClain, BA '77 on September 3rd, 2021

A new book of essays, Managing Challenges for the Flint Water Crisis (Westphalia Press), examines the crisis as a failure of municipal management.

Continue Reading A Public Policy Failure