A Magazine for the George Mason University Community

Faculty Research

Using Hip-Hop to Resolve Global Conflict

By Buzz McClain, BA '77 on November 21, 2016

Hip-hop DJs, emcees, beatmakers, and dancers from around the world descended on a hotel conference room in Washington, D.C., this spring to learn how to turn their high-energy musical art into tools for empowerment, entrepreneurship, and conflict resolution.

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Studying How Whales Swapped Feet for Fins

By Cathy Cruise, MFA '93 on November 2, 2016

Professor Mark D. Uhen in Mason’s Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Earth Sciences has long been fascinated with cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) and how they’ve evolved throughout history. While it’s common scientific knowledge these creatures evolved from terrestrial mammals, it was recently discovered that whales evolved from artiodactyls—the “even-toed ungulates” like cows and hippos.

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Race and Justice in America

By Colleen Kearney Rich on May 4, 2016

In the new book Deadly Injustice: Trayvon Martin, Race, and the Criminal Justice System (New York University Press, 2015), Mason criminology, law and society professor Devon Johnson and coeditors Patricia Y. Warren of Florida State University and Amy Farrell of Northwestern University use the Trayvon Martin/George Zimmerman case to explore how highly publicized criminal cases shape public opinion about offenders, the criminal process, and justice in the United States.

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The (Literary) South Does Rise Again

By Colleen Kearney Rich on January 28, 2016

It was at the 2012 Society for the Study of Southern Literature conference that Mason English professor Eric Gary Anderson and coeditors Taylor Haygood of Florida Atlantic University and Daniel Cross Turner at Coastal Carolina University started hatching the idea for the anthology Undead Souths: The Gothic and Beyond in Southern Literature and Culture (LSU Press, 2015).

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Class Invites Students to Make Themselves Uncomfortable

By Cathy Cruise, MFA '93 on January 28, 2016

Renowned psychologist Todd Kashdan pushes students out of their comfort zones to spur growth in his Science of Well-Being class.

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Mason history professor Alison Landsberg doesn’t see films and television as an escape. She believes they can be rich historical sources, offering a window onto the social, political, cultural, and economic landscapes of their historical moment. In her latest book, Engaging the Past: Mass Culture and the Production of Historical Knowledge (Columbia University Press, 2015), she looks at how these “texts” provoke historical thinking.

Continue Reading Engaging the Past: A Conversation with History Professor Alison Landsberg


The Pursuit of Happiness

By Colleen Kearney Rich on January 28, 2015

The senior scientist at Mason’s Center for the Advancement of Well-Being says our pursuit of happiness is actually making us unhappy,

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Conservation Work Improves Outcomes of Red Pandas

By Mason Spirit contributor on January 28, 2015

Conservation biologist Elizabeth Freeman says the birth of panda cubs at Mason’s Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute demonstrates how improved captive breeding programs and species survival can be accomplished across the globe.

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Identity and Power in Ukraine

By Buzz McClain, BA '77 on September 12, 2014

At the time of the publication of Mason professor Karina Korostelina’s book, Constructing the Narratives of Identity and Power: Self-Imagination in a Young Ukrainian Nation (Lexington Books, 2013), Ukraine had stepped to the forefront of the world’s news as the power struggle between the country, independent since the early 1990s, and Russia’s subsequent usurpation of Crimea grew violently hostile.

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The Challenges of International Adoption

By Colleen Kearney Rich on April 8, 2014

When Mason anthropology professor Linda J. Seligmann and her husband adopted a baby girl from China in 2000, the reception they received triggered her professional, as well as personal, curiosity. The experience led to her latest book, Broken Links, Enduring Ties: American Adoption across Race, Class, and Nation (Stanford University Press, 2013), which focuses on families who have adopted children from China and Russia, and families who have adopted African American children transracially.

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