A Magazine for the George Mason University Community

Books

Building a Mystery

By Colleen Kearney Rich on March 1, 2018

This fall Mason English professor and novelist Laura Ellen Scott, MFA ’93, saw the release of the second book, Crybaby Lane (Pandamoon Publishing, 2017) in her New Royal Mysteries trilogy. The books revolve around a university and its crime writing program in the fictional Ohio town of New Royal.

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Alumni Profile: Rion Amilcar Scott

By Tara Laskowski, MFA '05 on December 4, 2017

Rion Amilcar Scott, MFA Creative Writing ’08, my friend and fellow MFA grad, won the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction for his story collection Insurrections.

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Much More to the Story

By Cathy Cruise, MFA '93 on November 7, 2017

Mason communications officer John Hollis is a history buff, seasoned journalist, and author whose second book was published in October from Hugo House Publishers. The Making of a Hero: The Life and Death of Sgt. Rodney M. Davis tells the story of Hollis’s wife’s uncle, an African American who was presented a posthumous Medal of Honor for saving the lives of five fellow Marines in one of the fiercest battles of the Vietnam War.

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Stranger Than We Can Imagine

By Arthur Wesley, BA '17 on August 9, 2017

In his new book Exoplanets: Diamond Worlds, Super Earths, Pulsar Planets, and the New Search for Life Beyond Our Solar System (Smithsonian Press, 2017), Mason astronomy professor and NASA scientist Michael Summers shares the latest research on exoplanets, which are planets beyond our solar system. The book was written with co-author James Trefil, Robinson Professor of Physics at Mason.

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Ancient Digs Fit for a Queen

By Colleen Kearney Rich on May 10, 2017

In her book Nefertiti’s Sun Temple: A New Cult Complex at Tell el-Amarna , Mason Egyptologist Jacquelyn Williamson examines stone relief fragments excavated from the site of Kom el-Nana at Tell el-Amarna, Egypt, dating back to approximately 1350 BCE. This is the first time relief fragments can be associated with a specific wall from a specific temple at Tell el-Amarna. And this one just happened to belong to Queen Nefertiti.

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Studying How Whales Swapped Feet for Fins

By Cathy Cruise, MFA '93 on November 2, 2016

Professor Mark D. Uhen in Mason’s Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Earth Sciences has long been fascinated with cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) and how they’ve evolved throughout history. While it’s common scientific knowledge these creatures evolved from terrestrial mammals, it was recently discovered that whales evolved from artiodactyls—the “even-toed ungulates” like cows and hippos.

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A Fresh Look at Freedom of the Press

By Colleen Kearney Rich on July 12, 2016

In his first book, Free Speech and Unfree News: The Paradox of Press Freedom in America (Harvard University Press, 2016), Mason historian Sam Lebovic takes a historical look at freedom of the press and asks new questions about the role of the press in American democracy.

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Race and Justice in America

By Colleen Kearney Rich on May 4, 2016

In the new book Deadly Injustice: Trayvon Martin, Race, and the Criminal Justice System (New York University Press, 2015), Mason criminology, law and society professor Devon Johnson and coeditors Patricia Y. Warren of Florida State University and Amy Farrell of Northwestern University use the Trayvon Martin/George Zimmerman case to explore how highly publicized criminal cases shape public opinion about offenders, the criminal process, and justice in the United States.

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The (Literary) South Does Rise Again

By Colleen Kearney Rich on January 28, 2016

It was at the 2012 Society for the Study of Southern Literature conference that Mason English professor Eric Gary Anderson and coeditors Taylor Haygood of Florida Atlantic University and Daniel Cross Turner at Coastal Carolina University started hatching the idea for the anthology Undead Souths: The Gothic and Beyond in Southern Literature and Culture (LSU Press, 2015).

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The Pursuit of Happiness

By Colleen Kearney Rich on January 28, 2015

The senior scientist at Mason’s Center for the Advancement of Well-Being says our pursuit of happiness is actually making us unhappy,

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